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Apr 11, 2007

He's better...

We went back to the emergency room yesterday, and, after doing a CAT scan, which basically showed that the clot "was not larger, maybe a little smaller", they gave him something for pain, and we came home.   Because some ass-hole doctor put him on oxycontin a few years back, which he doesn't take anymore, he has a very high tolerance for pain meds.  So, what they give him works ok, but he still has pain, and probably will for a while.  Chronic pain is a bitch, if anyone has ever had it.  Thank God I have a high tolerance for pain, or I would be bitching and moaning all the time.   As the southerner's say, 'ole Uncle Arther (arthritis) is a pain in the ass.  Wish he'd carry his ass back where he come from.'

What really bothered me was his blood pressure.  Before they released him, his blood pressure was 145/104.  Now, I'm no doctor, but I think he should be on medication to control it.  I have taken it at home and it has been 189/110.  The doctor said, 'It's not high enough to treat.'  The family doctor  says 'it's not high enough to treat.'  Bullshit!  Can anyone say stroke?  My brother was 32 when he developed high blood pressure and has been on med's ever since.

EJ doesn't like me to talk to the doctor.  Because I have worked in a hospital, and use words like ambulation and affect and vital signs, and ask what are his O2 stats, the doctors immediately distrust me.  Don't ask me why.  Maybe they think I'm trying to show off, but if you have worked for anytime in the health care field, these words become part of your vocabulary.  Anyway, I jumped his ER doctor  about his blood pressure, and she said it wasn't that high.  I said it was.  She said it wasn't.

I ask questions.  Always.  Because I know what fuck-ups sometimes work in a hospital.  I know when they do shift change, some of the personnel sit around a bull-shit for an hour or so before they decide to check on a patient.  And, I know they make mistakes. 

Don't get me wrong.  Most of the people who work in health care are very caring and professional.  But it's the ones who stand around looking like fools that make it hard for everyone else.  I know the first thing you do when you enter a patient's room is greet them by name and wash your hands, which I did not see anyone do. Fuck the gloves, they are not foolproof. I know you always leave a patient with a call light in reach, which he didn't have.  Shit, I saw a lot of things that weren't up to par, but, maybe I'm too picky.  But I know when Medicare and Medicaid come in to do their annual inspection (so the hospital will continue to have that contract), good lord, the whole staff goes into overdrive to correct all the mistakes.   What's even wierder is that they notify the hospital, usually a month in advance what days they will probably be there.  What does this say about health care?  A lot of the things that goes on in a hospital happens because the legal department makes sure their ass is covered.  That's why you sign that statement before surgery saying you could die, because your surgeon might be an idiot or a crack-head or whatever.

You guys can jump me about this, but the best doctors I have dealt with were from India.  You may not be able to pronounce their names, but for some reason, they treat you like a person.  Some doctors from the Philippines also have this trait.   And they will listen to you, and answer your questions. 

I always wonder what a doctor's grade point average was when he graduated from medical school.  What if it was a 2.5, or just enough to pass?   Kinda scary, isn't it?

10 comments:

Bardouble29 said...

I am so glad your son is better! And just keep an eye on that blood pressure!

dawn said...

I'm glad about your son and yes I agree with most things you said about hospital. I deal with helping people get there claims paid by med. insurance and there just as guilty. It's very sad. Keep an eye on the blood pressure just because your his mom. Luv ya

Mary said...

I don't think you can ever ask enough questions. I don't trust anyone in the medical profession sadly.
I am glad EJ is feeling better.

Diesel said...

It's like that joke about what you call the guy who is last in his class in medical school.

"Doctor."

BTW, my blood pressure is way lower than that and they put me on medication for it.

Anne said...

If those doctors don't trust you, it's probably because they see you won't let them get away with anything. I don't like most doctors either. They're so egotistical. I'm glad your son's home. Did they say how long he might be sick?

Shrink wrapped scream said...

I am so glad EJ seems to be on the mend, you must feel a huge wash of relief. This post has given me a lead in for my next post (thank you for reminding me).

I agree so strongly with your views on medical care - or lack of it - sadly, the UK is every bit as bad. I've had years of battling with medical experts and professionals over how best to treat my son. It's only those who question, and who shout the loudest, that seem to get heard. Why won't anyone there wise-up to the fact that mother's do tend to know what's best?? Drives me nuts..

deuddersun said...

What do you call the guy who graduated last in his class from Med school?

Doctor.

d.

Enemy of the Republic said...

God bless....

Fuzzylogic said...

I was not aware of your son's illness.I'm sorry to hear that but glad that now he is on the mend.

Loving Annie said...

What you are saying about what goes on in a hospital is very accurate. I've volunteered in ana mergency room on and off for more than 5 years, and you're telling the truth. It is scary out there. You have to protect yourself by asking questions and insisting on things you know are right...